The Role of a “Glamorous” Event — South 36.32N / The New Fashion Latitude — in an Economy in Crisis

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The Role of a “Glamorous” Event — South 36.32N / The New Fashion Latitude — in an Economy in Crisis

by Chantal Houglan

Spain is filled with beautiful beaches and exclusive nightclubs, but under the glitz and glamour Spain is hurting. Spain is suffering from an economic crisis, where the unemployment rate is at an all time high. Citizens are searching for jobs and demanding answers from the government. Cádiz, the oldest inhabited city in Europe, hosts some of the most breathtaking views of Spain. Cádiz, however, is suffering from one of the worst unemployment rates in all of Spain.

This paper examines how South 36.32N: The New Fashion Latitude, a luxurious fashion festival hosted in Cádiz, is related to the economic depression in Cádiz. Cádiz may seem like an unusual location to host a fashion festival, but I passionately believe that there is no better place to host South 36.32N. I will argue that not only does South 36.32N draw in international publicity, which promotes the city of Cádiz, but drawing from the Glamour theory of fashion, South 36.32 N also allows the people of Cádiz to mentally escape from their everyday economic worries. South 36.32 N allows the public to be engulfed in a fantasy world of high fashion free of cost.

Cheap Fast Food: Cultural Changes and the Spanish Brand

Figura 1: Imagen del libro Igleburger por Álex Sampedro (Sampedro)

Cheap Fast Food: Cultural Changes and the Spanish Brand

by Carolyn Hartley

The traditional Mediterranean diet of Spaniards is changing. Not only does the shift to pre-made tortilla españolas and increase in international and national fast food chains indicate a change in what people are eating, but it also points to transformation in society and culture. With the modernizing Spanish diet as a symbol, local companies are manipulating the food in ads and media to convey social realities. This investigation is a case study of the historic city of Cádiz in Andalucía, and the major examples analyzed are posters and signs, television advertisements, food labels, and remarks by gaditanos in both social and academic settings. The purpose of this investigation is to analyze how the changing diet is being manipulated in advertising and how this manipulation is revealing of truths of modern Spanish culture, such as what values are causing tension: Regional vs. national identity; Importance of tradition in moving forward; and concerns of rising health problems such as obesity. This will help in the understanding of the connection between food and culture in modern Spain and connect it to its struggle to establish an image of itself amidst the noted tension.

“Reality” programs and obesity: How “The Scale” and “The Biggest Loser” show the cultural values ​​of Spain and the United States

2. Este niño de los Estados Unidos solo es un ejemplo de una gran población de personas que sufre de sobrepeso en el mundo. Foto de "Fast Food Nation," un articulo del gimnasio Fulton Fithouse.

“Reality” programs and obesity: How “The Scale” and “The Biggest Loser” show the cultural values ​​of Spain and the United States

by Abby Boyle

This paper explores the ways in which two different reality television shows – The Biggest Loser and Spain’s version of the same program, La Báscula – reflect cultural values and responses to the rising obesity rates in their respective countries.

Participants on The Biggest Loser are subject to more cruelty, specifically from their trainers, than are those on La Báscula, demonstrating a trend in American television: Many popular reality and fictional programs are designed to attract and repel the audience at the same time, making the shows themselves difficult to watch, but hard to turn off. The Biggest Loser also emphasizes the competitive aspect of the show, serving as one example of many American shows in which people strive to be the most powerful, most attractive, or the best at a certain specialty. The tone of La Báscula, however, is more positive, and the show focuses on the healthy ways in which contestants can lose weight rather than on the treatment of the participants or solely on the competition. The encouraging attitude that La Báscula projects towards weight loss reflects Spain’s more health-focused outlook on losing weight.

At the same time, both The Biggest Loser and La Báscula humanize the participants on each program, which is critical in these times when obese and overweight people are bullied and sometimes discriminated against in both countries. While both programs address the same issue differently, this humanizing aspect is powerful in encouraging viewers to see obese people as more than just statistics.

Obesity and the Weight Problem in Spain: A Study of Changes in the Spanish Diet

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Obesity and the Weight Problem in Spain: A Study of Changes in the Spanish Diet

by Ethan Pearlstein

This essay uses a multi-disciplinary approach, combining Hispanic cultural studies with medical science to examine factors that contribute to obesity in Spain, and more specifically, in the region of Andalucía. The issue is shown to not only be a product of strongly rooted cultural dietary preferences, but is due also to international influence in Spanish diet and economic development in the late twentieth century. In recent years, fast food establishments and American cuisine have come to replace more traditional Spanish fare, and the Mediterranean diet has been in constant decline. A more equilibrated intake of nutrients throughout the day with higher consumption of proteins in place of animal fats and simple sugars is implicated in helping to resolve this complex issue. The education of Andalucían residents with regard to this matter is largely nonexistent, one of the largest impediments in getting Spaniards to change their dietary habits in the prevention of obesity.

Success or failure: an analysis of anti-smoking laws in Spain

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Success or failure: an analysis of anti-smoking laws in Spain

by Alex Hayes

Smoking in Spain, which has long been more prevalent than in the majority of Europe and the U.S., has been a major health problem for decades. The government of Spain took particular interest in preventing smoking related problems in the early 2000’s, and has since implemented three pieces of legislation: first, in 2006, a partial ban on smoking in public interior spaces, second, a series of taxes to drive up prices of tobacco from 2006-2010, and finally, in 2011, a complete ban on smoking in public interior spaces. These laws have been greeted by mixed reviews, and currently remain controversial throughout the country. Supporters have cited improvements in health and air quality, while others reject the law based on the already suffering economy in Spain. Meanwhile, the government is still debating if it should have a future role in preventing smoking.

An advertising battle: The tobacco industry and anti-smoking campaigns

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An advertising battle: The tobacco industry and anti-smoking campaigns

by Eric Massey

During the last five centuries in Spain tobacco has lost the image that it once maintained as being a healthy substance, and earned a more accurate representation as being something addictive with serious health risks. Furthermore, both the Spanish government and anti-smoking campaigns have worked to erase the glamorous image that the tobacco industry had created of its product and replace it with one that is more scientifically accurate and fair to the consumers.

The efforts of both sides in this conflict have created a battle to control the representation of tobacco in the minds of the Spanish consumers, and in some cases the tobacco industry’s own methods that it used to mislead the public have been used by the anti-smoking campaigns in order to attract Spanish youth. Although not the entire population agrees with the anti-smoking efforts, they at least know the risks associated with what they are consuming.

The Andalusians, the “andaluses,” and “andalucez:” A study of the seseo/ceceo in Cadiz

Figura 2: El seseo, el ceceo, y la distinción en Andalucía
Recurso: Wikimedia Commons

The Andalusians, the “andaluses,” and “andalucez:” A study of the seseo/ceceo in Cadiz

by Curt Commander

Six interviews with local residents of Cádiz were conducted that recorded the participants’ opinions surrounding certain linguistic features present in Cádiz, namely seseo, ceceo, and distinción. The participants’ preferences for these features in regards to their own pronunciation were also measured through the recording of a short story read aloud by the participant with the particular story used eliciting the linguistic phenomena under study. Results suggested a correlation between higher education levels and a tendency to use distinción rather than seseo or ceceo. The participants’ opinions concerning seseo, ceceo, and distinción agreed in some areas but significantly differed in others.
Both the lack of agreement in many areas among those who were interviewed and the correlation between higher education levels and the use of distinción provide evidence of the strong linguistic variation within Andalucía that differs based on geography, education level, and personal opinion. So much variation within this region of Spain poses a problem for corporate and governmental entities that concern themselves with the entirety of Andalucía, having to choose which Andalusian dialect to use when addressing their linguistically-varied audience. Instead of singling out a specific Andalusian accent to use, various regionally-focused groups, such as Canal Sur, the news channel for Andalucía, have chosen to default to an accent from Madrid. Such actions are caused by unreconciled linguistic differences within the region and reveal the need for the adoption or creation of a collective, common accent for public use in Andalucía.

The State of the Hijab in Spain Today: Marker of Identity and Tolerance

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The State of the Hijab in Spain Today: Marker of Identity and Tolerance

by Rebecca Fulp-Eickstaedt

Immigration is a key issue in present-day Spain, and immigration rates in the country are currently very high. Although overall immigration rates are steep, it is important to note that the majority of Spain’s immigrants originate from North Africa—and that many of these individuals practice Islam. For this reason, I decided to conduct a research project related to Spain’s Muslim immigrant population during my study abroad experience. Specifically, my Cádiz research paper focuses on the status of the hijab in Spain at the present moment. Because the Islamic headscarf acts as a religious and cultural symbol for Muslim women who choose to wear it, the hijab represents an important element in the identities of many immigrant women in Spain. Despite this reality, the headscarf has caused (and continues to cause) tension and conflict in some aspects of Spanish society.

Steps in a new land: Immigrant women in domestic violence situations

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Steps in a new land: Immigrant women in domestic violence situations

by Mallory Tucker

This essay is the culminating work of a multi-week investigation based in Andalucía. With a particular interest in the situation of immigrant women living in Spain, “Pasos en una tierra nueva” examines the current Spanish perception of violence against women and questions how immigrant women living in the country can feel more connected to campaigns against such domestic violence. Spain’s heavy coverage of violence against women and its work to denounce “machismo”, or the idea that men must use violence and aggression to prove themselves, makes the country a stand-out in domestic violence prevention among other members of the European Union. Many of these demonstrations are, however, very nationalist centered, with a strong focus on Spanish women and Spanish men. Because of Spain’s growing immigrant population, however, especially from Middle Eastern and Latin American countries where domestic violence is relatively common, this paper examines a variety of popular Spanish vehicles for domestic violence prevention and education in hopes of pointing out ways by which Spain may expand their work to aid women of more diverse cultural backgrounds.

Limiting Social Consciousness: The Effect of Legislation Change on Gender Equality in Spain

Campaña del juego y el juguete no sexista, no violento del Instituto Andaluz de la Mujer para sensibilizar a la población sobre la necesidad de eliminar el contenido sexista en el aula

Limiting Social Consciousness: The Effect of Legislation Change on Gender Equality in Spain

by Alexcia Chambers

Gender based violence is a considerable domestic issue in Spain today. To combat this problem, reformers have placed special emphasis on coeducation as a means of promoting gender equality and preventing gender-based violence. However these developments have created serious backlash from the current central government, which is fighting against coeducation in schools and undoing innovative legislation. In January 2012, the Spanish central government eliminated the course on Education for the Citizen, the only subject in the Law for the Improvement of Educational Quality that addressed the issue of gender equality. Consequently, issues such as homosexuality and gender equality no longer have an official place in Spanish classrooms. The elimination of this subject shows that progressive laws passed in recent years do not reflect the reality or the current mentality of Spanish society, nor does it reflect any desire to invest in the future of gender equality. Today, Spain has significantly higher levels of violence against women as compared with other European countries, providing tangible evidence that the macho mentality created under Franco’s dictatorship 40 years ago still exists today. Under the regime of Francisco Franco, Spain experienced political oppression and severe limitations on civil rights.

Gender conciliation and parental co-responsibility

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Gender conciliation and parental co-responsibility

by Elizabeth Thomason

This study focuses on the effects that women in the workplace have had on the familial roles in Spain. The incorporation of women in the workplace has taken place primarily in the last century and it has had profound effects on society as we know it. This study addresses the traditional roles of women and how they are progressing and evolving. This in turn requires a reevaluation of everyone’s roles in the home. These tasks have certainly not lost importance but they can also not be forced fully upon working women. This change necessitates a sharing of the burdens of the house and familial care between a couple. There are many social policies and programs that have been organized in Spain to help alleviate the stress of unequal workloads. These include conciliation and co-responsibility, both of which are outlined and discussed in more detail. Though only beginning in Spain now, these policies have the potential to benefit other societies that have incorporated women into the workforce but have not necessarily changed the way society views the roles and responsibilities of women in the home. Spanish conciliation and co-responsibility will be the role models for other countries. Hopefully these Spanish policies will light the way to form a truly productive society with well-cared for homes, children, and elderly, alongside content workers, both male and female.

“The land is deaf” and the struggle for Spanish memory

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“The land is deaf” and the struggle for Spanish memory

by Lucas Pickett

After suffering through a three-year civil war and thirty-six years of a dictatorship at the hands of General Francisco Franco, Spain made a gradual transition to a more democratic system of government in the form of a constitutional monarchy. However, the atrocities of the war by those who took power afterwards were ignored for many years, and it has been within the past decade that significant debate in parliament has been made over dealing with the country’s turbulent history of the past century. In the midst of these debates in 2009, the Navarrese hard rock band Barricada published a concept album with lyrical themes explicitly addressing the issues of repression, human rights abuses, and historical memory. In the tradition of the best socially conscious rock ‘n roll, the album “La tierra esta’ sorda” (“The Land is Deaf”) uses the entertainment medium of music to inspire interest in the history of the country, as well as a form of criticism of one of the darkest periods of history on the Iberian Peninsula.

The Use of Art in the Public Sphere: Combating Urban Blight

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The Use of Art in the Public Sphere: Combating Urban Blight

by Laura Penalver

My research project focuses on the integration and impact of art in the public sphere. This issue is particularly relevant now due to its role as a combatant of urban decline caused by the economic crisis of 2008. I examine the qualities necessary for the art to be successful by using past examples of public art and comparing them to EscaparArtes, an initiative started in the spring of 2013 in Cadiz, Spain. After seeing the negative impact abandoned storefronts had on the surrounding shops, EscaparArtes decided to fill the empty store windows with works of art, the end goal being to revitalize consumerism in the area and counteract the urban decay. Unlike most public art works, EscaparArtes is temporary and the art only remains until the space is rented. This aspect, in combination with creating a show-like atmosphere, calls substantial attention to the storefront and sets it apart from other public art endeavors. I examine how EscaparArtes can be used as a model for future public art projects and what factors should be changed to increase effectiveness.

Creating independence for autistic children: the link between family involvement and support organizations in the effectiveness of educational programs

Una aula típica de Autismo Cádiz. Todo está etiquetada con pictogramas.

Creating independence for autistic children: the link between family involvement and support organizations in the effectiveness of educational programs

by Maren Leibowitz

Autism describes a spectrum developmental disorder, characterized by difficulties in verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction. Raising a child with autism can be stressful and trying for a family. Education programs intended to address some of these developmental issues were developed only in the past few decades, with scientific research improving educational techniques in the past 15-20 years. As technology advances, the use of touch-screen computers and other handheld devices have benefited autistic education immensely. The education of autistic children in Spain, and more specifically the province of Cádiz, lies in the hands of organizations such as Autismo Cádiz, a both privately and publicly funded institution focused on increasing the independence of people with autism as well as providing much needed support to their families. In light of Spain’s current economic crisis, the role of these organizations in autism education has become even more important as government funding to special education programs in schools dropped. The effectiveness of Autismo Cádiz’s education program comes from its emphasis on familial participation in creating a personalized approach for each child. The goal is to find some independence for these children and form a strong base in the hope that it translates to a good quality of life as they grow older. Autismo Cádiz is a fine example of the types of resources available to families in Spain.

A Community Unified in Support of La Perla

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A Community Unified in Support of La Perla

by Adrienne Castro

Flamenco is an integral part of Spanish culture. Flamenco clubs, commonly referred to as penas, are the main focus of my research investigation. I focus specifically on the club La Perla, situated in Cadiz. Different from other penas, La Perla seeks to include both tourists and the community. Many penas adopt a philosophy of exclusivity, noted by aficionados, individuals who want to keep flamenco only an art form for Andalusians. This specific pena makes an effort to invite and include any individual who is interested in the art form that is flamenco. The executive board created this place as a cultural center in southern Spain and defy the aficionado concept that flamenco is only for Southern Spaniards.

Can Soccer Unify Spain? The Politics of Soccer and Spain’s National Identity

Figura 5- Una actividad de la familia

Can Soccer Unify Spain? The Politics of Soccer and Spain’s National Identity

by Ariel French

Football in Spain is more than just a sport, or a leisurely activity; it is representative of the greater cultural climate of the country. Football plays a role in many aspects of Spanish life, ranging from cultural differences, business, and publicity to politics. It is a sport so ingrained in Spanish culture that it played an important part in Spain’s history under Franco’s dictatorship. Football can be used as a weapon by politicians, those that advocate a Spain united culturally, and those wishing for more cultural autonomy. Regionalism and class stratification become synonymous with the rivalries of clubs such as Real Madrid and Barcelona and the clubs of Sevilla, Sevilla FC and Real Betis. Identity in Spain evolves along with the football culture.

The Internet and Social Media as a Tool for Social Mobilization

“Toma La Calle” y #Nolesvotes en una pared en la calle C/ Canóvas del Castillo

The Internet and Social Media as a Tool for Social Mobilization

by Kimberly Boyce

Social movements have become an important part of Spanish culture as the Spanish public’s displeasure with the government and big business has increased. Massive street protests allow the Spanish public to have their voice heard nationally and internationally and to fight for change. To increase participation and interest in social movements, the internet and social media are modern tools used to connect activists with the Spanish public. This is especially important in Spain because the Spanish public shares more information through the internet and social media than in any other European country. This connection between the internet, social media, and the popular protest increases the probability that a particular movement will succeed in its goals and objectives. This essay studies two different social movements in Spain, the 15M and the Huelga General 14N, and analyzes their similar strategies in the internet and social media. Facebook and Twitter, two social media outlets, will be looked at specifically.

Regionalism and Tourism in Cadiz and Seville

Plaza de Espana

Regionalism and Tourism in Cadiz and Seville

by Byung Oh Jang

This paper is a comparative study of regionalism and tourism in Cádiz and Sevilla. The tourist trade uses regionalism to sell local culture and products. Both Cádiz and Sevilla use similar strategies in marketing themselves; not only do they use their natural advantages (natural beauty in the case of Cádiz and cultural assets for Sevilla), but they also diversify the range of tourism. For example, Cádiz has recently worked on renovating the cathedral as well as the area around it, while Sevilla has invested in advertising itself as a modern, active city as well as a place for music. While the specifics of the strategies are different, it is interesting to examine their similarities in the ways they market their regional tourism.