Overview of MANOS’s May 2013 Research in Chaguite, Nicaragua

Brooke Huffman '15

Overview of MANOS’s May 2013 Research in Chaguite, Nicaragua by Brooke Huffman Abstract No MANOS trip is exactly the same. Unlike our annual team trip over spring break that centers around providing medical care, summer and winter trips tend to focus on community capacity building, project-specific tasks, and independent research projects. Most of our time […]

Discourse on HIV/AIDS in Cape Town

Kattie Whitelaw '14 (L) and Lauren Barbera '15 (R) making a new friend in Langa Township.

Discourse on HIV/AIDS in Cape Town, South Africa in Regards to Apartheid Memory and Reconciliation by Katie Whitelaw and Lauren Barbera   Introduction Our HIV/AIDS project changed dramatically throughout performing our field research in Cape Town, South Africa. We initially thought that this complex problem was actually a simple lack of education. After all, why […]

Cheap Fast Food: Cultural Changes and the Spanish Brand

Figura 1: Imagen del libro Igleburger por Álex Sampedro (Sampedro)

Cheap Fast Food: Cultural Changes and the Spanish Brand

by Carolyn Hartley

The traditional Mediterranean diet of Spaniards is changing. Not only does the shift to pre-made tortilla españolas and increase in international and national fast food chains indicate a change in what people are eating, but it also points to transformation in society and culture. With the modernizing Spanish diet as a symbol, local companies are manipulating the food in ads and media to convey social realities. This investigation is a case study of the historic city of Cádiz in Andalucía, and the major examples analyzed are posters and signs, television advertisements, food labels, and remarks by gaditanos in both social and academic settings. The purpose of this investigation is to analyze how the changing diet is being manipulated in advertising and how this manipulation is revealing of truths of modern Spanish culture, such as what values are causing tension: Regional vs. national identity; Importance of tradition in moving forward; and concerns of rising health problems such as obesity. This will help in the understanding of the connection between food and culture in modern Spain and connect it to its struggle to establish an image of itself amidst the noted tension.

Obesity and the Weight Problem in Spain: A Study of Changes in the Spanish Diet

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Obesity and the Weight Problem in Spain: A Study of Changes in the Spanish Diet

by Ethan Pearlstein

This essay uses a multi-disciplinary approach, combining Hispanic cultural studies with medical science to examine factors that contribute to obesity in Spain, and more specifically, in the region of Andalucía. The issue is shown to not only be a product of strongly rooted cultural dietary preferences, but is due also to international influence in Spanish diet and economic development in the late twentieth century. In recent years, fast food establishments and American cuisine have come to replace more traditional Spanish fare, and the Mediterranean diet has been in constant decline. A more equilibrated intake of nutrients throughout the day with higher consumption of proteins in place of animal fats and simple sugars is implicated in helping to resolve this complex issue. The education of Andalucían residents with regard to this matter is largely nonexistent, one of the largest impediments in getting Spaniards to change their dietary habits in the prevention of obesity.

Success or failure: an analysis of anti-smoking laws in Spain

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Success or failure: an analysis of anti-smoking laws in Spain

by Alex Hayes

Smoking in Spain, which has long been more prevalent than in the majority of Europe and the U.S., has been a major health problem for decades. The government of Spain took particular interest in preventing smoking related problems in the early 2000’s, and has since implemented three pieces of legislation: first, in 2006, a partial ban on smoking in public interior spaces, second, a series of taxes to drive up prices of tobacco from 2006-2010, and finally, in 2011, a complete ban on smoking in public interior spaces. These laws have been greeted by mixed reviews, and currently remain controversial throughout the country. Supporters have cited improvements in health and air quality, while others reject the law based on the already suffering economy in Spain. Meanwhile, the government is still debating if it should have a future role in preventing smoking.

An advertising battle: The tobacco industry and anti-smoking campaigns

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An advertising battle: The tobacco industry and anti-smoking campaigns

by Eric Massey

During the last five centuries in Spain tobacco has lost the image that it once maintained as being a healthy substance, and earned a more accurate representation as being something addictive with serious health risks. Furthermore, both the Spanish government and anti-smoking campaigns have worked to erase the glamorous image that the tobacco industry had created of its product and replace it with one that is more scientifically accurate and fair to the consumers.

The efforts of both sides in this conflict have created a battle to control the representation of tobacco in the minds of the Spanish consumers, and in some cases the tobacco industry’s own methods that it used to mislead the public have been used by the anti-smoking campaigns in order to attract Spanish youth. Although not the entire population agrees with the anti-smoking efforts, they at least know the risks associated with what they are consuming.