“The land is deaf” and the struggle for Spanish memory

pickett01

“The land is deaf” and the struggle for Spanish memory

by Lucas Pickett

After suffering through a three-year civil war and thirty-six years of a dictatorship at the hands of General Francisco Franco, Spain made a gradual transition to a more democratic system of government in the form of a constitutional monarchy. However, the atrocities of the war by those who took power afterwards were ignored for many years, and it has been within the past decade that significant debate in parliament has been made over dealing with the country’s turbulent history of the past century. In the midst of these debates in 2009, the Navarrese hard rock band Barricada published a concept album with lyrical themes explicitly addressing the issues of repression, human rights abuses, and historical memory. In the tradition of the best socially conscious rock ‘n roll, the album “La tierra esta’ sorda” (“The Land is Deaf”) uses the entertainment medium of music to inspire interest in the history of the country, as well as a form of criticism of one of the darkest periods of history on the Iberian Peninsula.

A Community Unified in Support of La Perla

Adrienne Castro '14

A Community Unified in Support of La Perla

by Adrienne Castro

Flamenco is an integral part of Spanish culture. Flamenco clubs, commonly referred to as penas, are the main focus of my research investigation. I focus specifically on the club La Perla, situated in Cadiz. Different from other penas, La Perla seeks to include both tourists and the community. Many penas adopt a philosophy of exclusivity, noted by aficionados, individuals who want to keep flamenco only an art form for Andalusians. This specific pena makes an effort to invite and include any individual who is interested in the art form that is flamenco. The executive board created this place as a cultural center in southern Spain and defy the aficionado concept that flamenco is only for Southern Spaniards.